What I Made: Tomato and Pepper Frittata (with a side of concord grapes); BLT Salad; Tekka Don with Yellowfin

IMG_5042.JPG

Tomato and Peppers Frittata:

Ingredients:

  • 4 eggs
  • 4 poblano peppers, cut into slices
  • two large tomatoes, cored and chopped
  • 4 scallions, sliced
  • salt and pepper
  • pork lard or bacon fat

Preparation:

  1. Heat cooking fat over medium heat
  2. Crack and mix eggs with salt and pepper
  3. throw peppers, tomatoes and scallions into pan, and cook until fragrant and tomatoes have started releasing their juices.
  4. Add eggs to pan and swirl to distribute throughout the pan
  5. Cook until set. Slice into 4 slices and eat. Serves 2.

Eat with grapes! Always a good idea.

IMG_5051.JPG

BLT Salad:

Pretty self explanatory. Although, I made my own bacon from the pork belly we got from Meat Club. (Or, the meat share, but the guy who runs it calls it Meat Club, which I kind of like.) I chopped everything up and topped it with some Umi vinegar.

Tekka Don:

FullSizeRender 18.jpg

You only get to make this one if you have a fish share. But if you do, lucky you. Also needs no recipe, I don’t think. But if anyone disagrees let me know and I will talk you through making sushi rice and ya know…chopping avocado.

Want to see YOUR recipe on this blog? You can! Submit your recipes to redhookbkcsa@gmail.com and you will also get hours for it!!

Advertisements

What I Made: Three Cup Chicken with Shishito Peppers and Purple Basil; Swordfish with Cherry Tomatoes and Anchovy Sauce; and Plum and Blueberry Torte

 

IMG_4911.JPG

Three Cup Chicken:

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1 2-to-3-inch piece of ginger, peeled and sliced into coins, approximately 12
  • 12 cloves of garlic (or more to taste), peeled
  • 4 whole scallions, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • a bunch of shishito peppers
  • 2 pounds chicken thighs, boneless or bone-in, cut into bite-size pieces
  • 1 tablespoon unrefined or light brown sugar
  • ½ cup rice wine
  • ¼ cup light soy sauce
  • 2 cups purple basil

Preparation:

 

  1. Heat a wok over high heat and add 2 tablespoons sesame oil. When the oil shimmers, add the ginger, garlic, scallions and peppers, and cook until fragrant, approximately 2 minutes.
  2. Scrape the aromatics to the sides of the wok, add remaining oil and allow to heat through. Add the chicken, and cook, stirring occasionally, until it is browned and crisping at the edges, approximately 5 to 7 minutes.
  3. Add sugar and stir to combine, then add the rice wine and soy sauce, and bring just to a boil. Lower the heat, then simmer until the sauce has reduced and started to thicken, approximately 15 minutes.
  4. Turn off the heat, add the basil and stir to combine.

Swordfish with Cherry Tomatoes and Anchovy Sauce:

img_4985

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb swordfish, if using Mermaid’s Garden’s, cut in half
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes
  • 1 jalapeno, thinly sliced
  • 4 anchovy filets
  • 3 Tbsp.  Olive Oil
  • a branch of purple basil
  • ½ Cup  White Wine
  • Salt and Pepper

Preparation:

  1. Put 2 Tbsp. olive oil oil, anchovy, garlic and jalapeno in a heavy sauté pan that has a tight fitting lid. Place the pan over medium-low heat until the anchovy begins to break down a bit, about 2 minutes.
  2. Add the tomatoes, basil, wine and a bit of salt to the pan. Increase the heat to medium-high, place the lid on the pan and cook about 15 minutes, until the tomatoes have released their juices and are nice and cooked. Remove the pan from the heat and set aside.
  3. While the sauce is cooking, season both sides of the swordfish with salt and pepper. Heat a heavy pan over medium-high heat, when hot add the fish and cook for 3-4 minutes per side until desired doneness is reached.
  4. Spoon sauce onto fish and enjoy.

Plum and Blueberry Torte

So, I just got back from Maine and have a boatload of blueberries, so I threw some in. You don’t have to…I mostly made this for all those plums we’ve been getting. I followed the Marian Burros’ Original Plum Torte recipe that’s published every year in the Times. It’s easy. And delicious. You should definitely make it.

IMG_4962.JPG

Ingredients:

  • ¾ to 1 cup sugar
  • ½ cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 cup unbleached flour, sifted
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • Pinch of salt (optional)
  • 2 eggs
  • 12 halves pitted purple plums
  • 1 pint blueberries (or omit and double the plums)
  • Sugar, lemon juice and cinnamon, for topping

Preparation:

 

  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Cream the sugar and butter in a bowl. Add the flour, baking powder, salt and eggs and beat well.
  3. Spoon the batter into a springform pan of 8, 9 or 10 inches. Place the plum halves skin side up on top of the batter. Sprinkle lightly with sugar and lemon juice, depending on the sweetness of the fruit. Sprinkle with about 1 teaspoon of cinnamon, depending on how much you like cinnamon.
  4. Bake 1 hour, approximately. Remove and cool; refrigerate or freeze if desired. Or cool to lukewarm and serve plain or with whipped cream. (To serve a torte that was frozen, defrost and reheat it briefly at 300 degrees.)

 

 

What I Made: Chard Rice Bowl, Barely Pickled Cucumbers, Spaghetti with Cherry Tomatoes, Anchovies and Sage, Pork Katsu with Pickled Cucumbers

IMG_4532

This is one of my favorite meals, it’s quick and easy and delicious. It tastes just as good without the chorizo so you vegetarians can make this, too. Just don’t leave out the cumin seeds or the garlic chips, those are the stars of this dish.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup medium- or short-grain white or brown rice (I prefer brown but only had white — brown tastes better with this recipe)
  • Kosher salt, as needed
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 large bunch Swiss chard, leaves and stems separated
  • 2 tablespoons cumin seeds
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, more as needed
  • 2 fresh (uncured) chorizo sausages, casings removed, meat formed into patties OR smoked chorizo OR cured chorizo — I’ve yet to find a combo that doesn’t work
  • 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons cider vinegar, as needed

Preparation: 

  1. In a medium pot, combine rice with 2 1/3 cups lightly salted water. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low, cover pot and cook until rice is tender, 40 to 50 minutes. Let stand off the heat, covered, for 10 minutes. Toss in 1 tablespoon butter and salt to taste. Alternatively, cook rice in a rice cooker.
  2. Meanwhile, cut the chard leaves into 2-inch pieces and the stems into 1/2-inch lengths.
  3. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Toast cumin seeds in the dry pan until they are fragrant and slightly darker in color, 1 to 2 minutes. Pour cumin onto a plate to stop the cooking.
  4. If using uncured chorizo, add 1 tablespoon oil to the pan, let it heat for a few seconds, then add chorizo patties and cook until golden on both sides and cooked through, about 7 minutes. Transfer to a paper-towel-lined plate.
  5. Add 2 tablespoons oil to the skillet, then add garlic. Cook until golden and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer garlic to a paper-towel-lined plate.
  6. Add chard stems and a large pinch of salt to the skillet. Cook until stems are almost tender, about 5 minutes. Add chard leaves, another pinch of salt, 1 tablespoon butter and 1 tablespoon vinegar. Cook until leaves are wilted, 2 to 3 minutes.
  7. Toss chard with rice, toasted cumin, the remaining 3 tablespoons olive oil, 1 tablespoon vinegar, and salt and pepper. Taste and adjust seasonings if necessary. Sprinkle with sea salt.

Barely Pickled Cucumbers:

IMG_4531

Ingredients:

  • Cucumbers
  • water
  • salt
  • coriander seeds
  • pepper seeds
  • smashed garlic
  • fresh dill

Preparation:

  1. Cut cucumbers into spears and place spears into jars.
  2. Fill jars with water; pour that water out into a cup and weigh.
  3. Add 5% of the water’s weight in salt to the water and transfer to a pot, heat along with coriander, pepper and garlic until the salt is dissolved. Remove from heat and cool completely.
  4. Once brine is cooled, add fresh dill and pour over cucumber spears.
  5. Close lids and place in the fridge for at least 24 hours.

Spaghetti with Cherry Tomatoes, Anchovies and Sage

IMG_4527

Ingredients:

  • 1 small red onion, finely diced, about 1/2 cup
  • Salt and pepper
  • 4 anchovy fillets, rinsed and chopped, about 1 tablespoon
  • 2 garlic cloves, sliced
  • Pinch of crushed red pepper
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 4 tablespoons fruity extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to drizzle
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh summer savory or marjoram
  • 1 ½ pounds cherry tomatoes, in halves or quarters
  • 1 pound fresh pasta, such as spaghetti or linguine
  • Handful of torn sage leaves

Preparation:

  1. Put red onion in a large bowl and season with salt and pepper. Add anchovies, garlic, red pepper and vinegar. Stir in olive oil and savory. Add the cherry tomatoes, season with salt, and toss well to coat. Keep mixture cool (or refrigerate) for up to 3 hours.
  2. Boil pasta in a large pot of well-salted water until al dente, then drain and transfer to a wide low pasta bowl. Add cherry tomato mixture and toss well to coat. Drizzle with a little more olive oil and serve at room temperature, garnished with sage.

Pork Katsu with Pickled Cucumbers:

IMG_4513

This worked really well for me since I also have our fantastic meat share (ps that’s where I got the chorizo above, too) and their boneless pork chops were PERFECT for this meal. YUM!!!

Ingredients:

  • ½ pound small Kirby cucumbers, sliced into 1/4-inch-thick rounds
  • 1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt, more for seasoning
  • 1 ¼ teaspoons sugar
  • 8 thin slices boneless pork medallions or center-cut pork chops (about 1 1/2 pounds)
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 2 cups panko crumbs
  • ½ cup flour
  • Black pepper
  • Peanut or vegetable oil, for frying
  • 2 tablespoons sliced scallions
  • 2 teaspoons rice wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon minced shiso or basil
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon toasted Asian sesame oil

Preparation:

  1. Place the cucumbers in a colander set over a bowl. Toss them with 1 teaspoon salt and 3/4 teaspoon sugar.
  2. Place each piece of pork between sheets of waxed paper. Pound meat to 1/8-inch thickness.
  3. Place eggs in a large shallow bowl; whisk in the Worcestershire and tomato paste. Place the panko and flour in two separate shallow bowls.
  4. Season cutlets with salt and pepper. Dip each cutlet in the flour (tap off excess), the egg mixture (ditto), then dredge in panko crumbs.
  5. Heat a large pan, pour in 1/8 inch of oil and heat for 30 seconds. Working in batches, put cutlets in the pan. Immediately shake and tilt it so the oil rolls over the pork in waves (this will give it a lighter, crisper crust). Shake the pan occasionally, until cutlets are golden on the bottom, about 3 minutes. Flip them and shake again. Cook 2 to 3 minutes longer. Transfer pork to a paper-towel-lined platter to drain.
  6. Pat the cucumbers dry with paper towels. Toss with scallions, vinegar, shiso, soy sauce, sesame oil and 1/2 teaspoon sugar. Serve cutlets with pickled cucumbers on the side.

CSA Share: August 18

Small shares will be getting pears this week, grown on the farm. Photo by brokinhrt2.

 

This is an exciting week for the farm: We harvested our first “fruit” of the season!

I put it in quotes because I’m referring to the cultural definition of fruit (a sweet fruit that is more often eaten as a dessert or snack) rather than the scientific one (any fruiting part of the plant regardless of use). Zucchini, eggplant and tomatoes are all the fruit of the plant, but are vegetables and not “fruit” in the common lexicon…

Anyway: Large shares will be getting melons and small shares will be getting pears this week. The pears are still pretty hard. Personally I like crunchy pears and think they taste great right now, but you could leave them out for a couple days to get a bit riper if you prefer. Who knew we’d actually get a small harvest from one of our fruit trees!

Other things you might find in the share this week are tomatoes, beets, squash, raddichio, arugula, cucumbers, eggplant, collard/chard/kale, and garlic…

Enjoy,
-Shayna

Mid-Season Update From Ian Marvy

Hi Friends and Neighbors,

We have really begun to feel global climate change in a drastic way this year. Before spring even hit, the apple crop had blossomed. Apples, normally the mainstay of the autumnal fruit CSA, are in for a difficult season; the early warmth in the winter, followed by regular frosts, killed many apple blossoms in early spring. Then heavy wind and rain blew away the second succession of flowers.

Many orchards in the region are expecting smaller yields this year and it’s not just here in our state or our region; the whole Midwest and parts of the Northwest are suffering from 80% crop loss in the apple industry.

Spring as a whole was great for us greens-growing farms. But the heat hit early, as you know, killing off the harvest before we could bring you tomatoes, eggplant and peppers. But the heat is not just the issue. Despite dramatic rain falls that keeps us above the board, the rest of the nation and really the majority of the planet is now in drought.

Wheat, corn and soy are already more expensive on the open commodity market, meaning milk, cheese, meat, and your regular slice will all soon be more expensive.

Here at Added Value have been mindful of the weather and conscious of your timely investment. We plan to continue to deliver high-quality, flavorful, nutritious foods grown in a way that respects the planet, you, your family and our neighbors. As weather changes we are making adjustments and look forward to sharing the bounties to come.

We are motivated by our partnership, thankful for the investment, and excited to share with you the fruits of our collective labor.

Ian

Now some notes from the farm crew.

You’ve probably all seen the garlic curing in the harvest station this past month; it is now ready and you’ll be getting some this week. It was a lot to process and sort out (the biggest, prettiest ones get saved to be seed for next year’s crop); thankfully we had a big crew of young people around today to help us out! Many hands do indeed lighten up the work load.

As for the rest of the share, all across the region and here in Red Hook the summer crops are starting to kick in one by one! We started harvesting tomatoes this week (though there are only enough for market so far. You guys will be getting them in the next couple of weeks) and the eggplants, peppers and cucumbers are starting to look pretty big. Some other things that might be in your share this week: dandelion greens, sorrel, onions, beets, kohlrabi, cooking greens (chard, collards, broccoli greens, amaranth), scallions, squash, arugula…

We’re thrilled to have peaches at a better price than ever before this week. This year’s peaches from Phillips’ Farm have been outstanding, and this week he has offered them to us for a special price. Given the anticipation of high prices in the fall for local fruit, we want to take advantage of every opportunity to provide our CSA with abundant fruit while we can.

Small fruit shares will be receiving 3 lbs of peaches; large shares will be receiving 5 lbs.

For now, enjoy the Red Hook red garlic and the beautiful peaches!

The Added Value Team 

Shiso-Shallot Butter Steak

All summer, I’ve been longing to grill in the Summit Street Community Garden, so this recipe for grilled skirt steak from Food & Wine by Tyler Florence finally gave me the opportunity. Since the shiso butter can be made a month in advance, we used ours a few weeks later, with an earlier batch of CSA shiso. —Josie Rubio

{Recipe after the jump}

Continue reading

Szechuan Green Beans

A weekend in Vermont and New Hampshire turned into an extended stay after the demise of our car. (Everyone: make sure it isn’t time to change your timing belt!) A friend got our vegetables that week, and then the hurricane hit, and then this week’s CSA share was ready for pickup. In short, I have a lot of vegetables.  I’m no longer sure what week’s share they belong to; I just know I have a lot of eating to do.

With my CSA green beans, I suggested to my boyfriend that he make that pork and beans recipe he made earlier in the summer. He looked at me blankly, picturing baked beans. “You know—with the ground pork over beans?” What I meant was this Szechuan Green Beans recipe that we now call “Asian pork and beans.” This recipe is easy to make (especially easy for me since my boyfriend makes it) and absolutely delicious. Josie Rubio

{Recipe after the jump}

Continue reading