What I Made: Minute Steak Tacos with Roasted Poblanos; Ramekin Baked Egg with Tomatoes, Greens and Garlic Chips and Eggplant with Ground Beef, Tomato and Pine Nuts

Minute Steak Tacos with Roasted Poblanos:

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Ingredients:

  • Beef Minute Steak (from Meat Share!)
  • 4 – 5 Poblano Peppers
  • Shaved Red Onion
  • Flour Tortillas
  • Mayo
  • Sriracha Sauce

Preparation:

  1. Heat broiler. Once hot, place peppers in broiler for a couple of minutes per side. Remove and set aside to cool
  2. While peppers are roasting, place minute steak in a skillet or on the bbq. Cook a few minutes each side depending on how rare you like your steak.
  3. Mix mayo and sriracha sauce and set aside.
  4. Remove the seeds and slice peppers thinly.
  5. Assemble: sauce, meat, poblanos and onion. Simple and delicious.

Ramekin Baked Egg with Tomatoes, Greens and Garlic Chips :

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Ingredients: 

(serves 2)

  • One bunch of leafy greens (like chard)
  • 1 pint tomatoes
  • 2 cloves of garlic, sliced thinly
  • 2 eggs
  • Olive oil

Preparation:

  1. Pre-heat oven to 350 F.
  2. Heat 1 tbls. oil in small skillet. When it shimmers, add the garlic and fry until crisp on both sides. Transfer to a paper towel to dry,
  3. Re-heat the garlic oil, and add tomatoes. Cook for about 5 minutes, and then add the chopped greens, and sauté until wilted.
  4. Transfer the tomato/greens mixture to 2 ramekins and crack an egg on each one. Sprinkle with sea salt.
  5. Bake for 10 minutes or until the whites of the egg are set.
  6. Add salt as needed and garnish with garlic chips.

Eggplant with Ground Beef, Tomato and Pine Nuts

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I wish I could have taken a better picture of this. It was really, really tasty.

Ingredients:

  • 2 large firm eggplants, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, more as needed
  • 1 medium yellow onion, finely diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 pound ground beef (80 percent lean)
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Black pepper
  • ½ tablespoon unsalted butter
  • ½ cup pine nuts

Preparation:

  1. Heat broiler and line a baking sheet with foil or parchment.
  2. Brush both sides of eggplant slices with 2 tablespoons olive oil and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon salt. Arrange slices on prepared baking sheet and broil in batches until they are deep mahogany brown, turning once halfway through, 5 to 7 minutes per side.
  3. Adjust the oven to 375 degrees with rack positioned in the center.
  4. In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the remaining olive oil over medium heat. Add onion and sauté until translucent, but not browned, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add ground beef, stirring frequently and breaking up meat into very small pieces with the side of a metal spoon. Season with remaining teaspoon salt, cinnamon and pepper. Sauté until meat is just cooked through. Taste and add more salt or pepper, or both, as needed.
  5. In a medium skillet, melt butter over medium heat. Add pine nuts and reduce heat to medium-low. Stir nuts to coat them with butter and continue stirring constantly until nuts are golden brown, 2 to 4 minutes. Transfer nuts to a bowl while still warm and salt them lightly.
  6. Coat a 13-by-9-by-2-inch baking dish with remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Spread 1/2 cup of tomato sauce in the bottom of the dish. Lay 1/3 of the eggplant slices in a single layer over the sauce, covering as much surface area of the bottom of the dish as possible. Spoon half the meat evenly over eggplant. Pour 1/3 of the remaining tomato sauce evenly over meat. Sprinkle with 1/3 of the pine nuts. Layer again with eggplant, meat, tomato sauce and pine nuts. Finish with a layer of eggplant and cover with more tomato sauce, sprinkling top with pine nuts.
  7. Cover pan with foil and bake for 90 minutes. Remove foil and top eggplant evenly with mozzarella. Bake for 15 minutes longer, uncovered, or until the cheese is bubbling and golden.
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What I Made: Chard Rice Bowl, Barely Pickled Cucumbers, Spaghetti with Cherry Tomatoes, Anchovies and Sage, Pork Katsu with Pickled Cucumbers

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This is one of my favorite meals, it’s quick and easy and delicious. It tastes just as good without the chorizo so you vegetarians can make this, too. Just don’t leave out the cumin seeds or the garlic chips, those are the stars of this dish.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup medium- or short-grain white or brown rice (I prefer brown but only had white — brown tastes better with this recipe)
  • Kosher salt, as needed
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 large bunch Swiss chard, leaves and stems separated
  • 2 tablespoons cumin seeds
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, more as needed
  • 2 fresh (uncured) chorizo sausages, casings removed, meat formed into patties OR smoked chorizo OR cured chorizo — I’ve yet to find a combo that doesn’t work
  • 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons cider vinegar, as needed

Preparation: 

  1. In a medium pot, combine rice with 2 1/3 cups lightly salted water. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low, cover pot and cook until rice is tender, 40 to 50 minutes. Let stand off the heat, covered, for 10 minutes. Toss in 1 tablespoon butter and salt to taste. Alternatively, cook rice in a rice cooker.
  2. Meanwhile, cut the chard leaves into 2-inch pieces and the stems into 1/2-inch lengths.
  3. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Toast cumin seeds in the dry pan until they are fragrant and slightly darker in color, 1 to 2 minutes. Pour cumin onto a plate to stop the cooking.
  4. If using uncured chorizo, add 1 tablespoon oil to the pan, let it heat for a few seconds, then add chorizo patties and cook until golden on both sides and cooked through, about 7 minutes. Transfer to a paper-towel-lined plate.
  5. Add 2 tablespoons oil to the skillet, then add garlic. Cook until golden and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer garlic to a paper-towel-lined plate.
  6. Add chard stems and a large pinch of salt to the skillet. Cook until stems are almost tender, about 5 minutes. Add chard leaves, another pinch of salt, 1 tablespoon butter and 1 tablespoon vinegar. Cook until leaves are wilted, 2 to 3 minutes.
  7. Toss chard with rice, toasted cumin, the remaining 3 tablespoons olive oil, 1 tablespoon vinegar, and salt and pepper. Taste and adjust seasonings if necessary. Sprinkle with sea salt.

Barely Pickled Cucumbers:

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Ingredients:

  • Cucumbers
  • water
  • salt
  • coriander seeds
  • pepper seeds
  • smashed garlic
  • fresh dill

Preparation:

  1. Cut cucumbers into spears and place spears into jars.
  2. Fill jars with water; pour that water out into a cup and weigh.
  3. Add 5% of the water’s weight in salt to the water and transfer to a pot, heat along with coriander, pepper and garlic until the salt is dissolved. Remove from heat and cool completely.
  4. Once brine is cooled, add fresh dill and pour over cucumber spears.
  5. Close lids and place in the fridge for at least 24 hours.

Spaghetti with Cherry Tomatoes, Anchovies and Sage

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Ingredients:

  • 1 small red onion, finely diced, about 1/2 cup
  • Salt and pepper
  • 4 anchovy fillets, rinsed and chopped, about 1 tablespoon
  • 2 garlic cloves, sliced
  • Pinch of crushed red pepper
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 4 tablespoons fruity extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to drizzle
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh summer savory or marjoram
  • 1 ½ pounds cherry tomatoes, in halves or quarters
  • 1 pound fresh pasta, such as spaghetti or linguine
  • Handful of torn sage leaves

Preparation:

  1. Put red onion in a large bowl and season with salt and pepper. Add anchovies, garlic, red pepper and vinegar. Stir in olive oil and savory. Add the cherry tomatoes, season with salt, and toss well to coat. Keep mixture cool (or refrigerate) for up to 3 hours.
  2. Boil pasta in a large pot of well-salted water until al dente, then drain and transfer to a wide low pasta bowl. Add cherry tomato mixture and toss well to coat. Drizzle with a little more olive oil and serve at room temperature, garnished with sage.

Pork Katsu with Pickled Cucumbers:

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This worked really well for me since I also have our fantastic meat share (ps that’s where I got the chorizo above, too) and their boneless pork chops were PERFECT for this meal. YUM!!!

Ingredients:

  • ½ pound small Kirby cucumbers, sliced into 1/4-inch-thick rounds
  • 1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt, more for seasoning
  • 1 ¼ teaspoons sugar
  • 8 thin slices boneless pork medallions or center-cut pork chops (about 1 1/2 pounds)
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 2 cups panko crumbs
  • ½ cup flour
  • Black pepper
  • Peanut or vegetable oil, for frying
  • 2 tablespoons sliced scallions
  • 2 teaspoons rice wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon minced shiso or basil
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon toasted Asian sesame oil

Preparation:

  1. Place the cucumbers in a colander set over a bowl. Toss them with 1 teaspoon salt and 3/4 teaspoon sugar.
  2. Place each piece of pork between sheets of waxed paper. Pound meat to 1/8-inch thickness.
  3. Place eggs in a large shallow bowl; whisk in the Worcestershire and tomato paste. Place the panko and flour in two separate shallow bowls.
  4. Season cutlets with salt and pepper. Dip each cutlet in the flour (tap off excess), the egg mixture (ditto), then dredge in panko crumbs.
  5. Heat a large pan, pour in 1/8 inch of oil and heat for 30 seconds. Working in batches, put cutlets in the pan. Immediately shake and tilt it so the oil rolls over the pork in waves (this will give it a lighter, crisper crust). Shake the pan occasionally, until cutlets are golden on the bottom, about 3 minutes. Flip them and shake again. Cook 2 to 3 minutes longer. Transfer pork to a paper-towel-lined platter to drain.
  6. Pat the cucumbers dry with paper towels. Toss with scallions, vinegar, shiso, soy sauce, sesame oil and 1/2 teaspoon sugar. Serve cutlets with pickled cucumbers on the side.

How A Busy Mom Uses All Those CSA Veggies

Sunday night dinner in the Foley-Murphy household.

Among other things, I’m a mom to an almost five year old and a two month old. Before I was a mom I had hobbies and crafty creative projects going on in my life; now my main hobby is making good food. It works out nicely because my family likes to eat. And for this hobby I love the CSA season. There is nothing better than taking something that we’ve never heard of and turning it into something delicious, especially if my daughter agrees that it is delicious.

I get really excited about it. When I talk about it at social functions and family reunions, I’m met most often with people looking at me like I have three heads (oh, really you made kohlrabi “french fries”… ) but sometimes my excitement finds a kindred spirit.  I’m guessing that in the CSA community there will be more in the later camp and thought I’d share my strategy and a couple of recipes that we have liked in the past few weeks.

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CSA Share: July 23

The tomatoes are coming, the tomatoes are coming!

“I ate our first tomato today,” Kristen reports this week. “It’s possibly the most exciting moment on the farm for me. Well, maybe the first pea could be a close second. However, for some reason the tomatoes take sooo long and require sooo much attention that seeing that first one is quite possibly the closest I can come to know what it feels like to send your child off to their first day of school.”

The eggplants, melons and okra are also starting to product their first fruits. In the meantime, get those chard recipes ready — here’s what you can expect in this week’s share. Come get yours on the farm Saturday between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.

{This week’s share details after the jump}

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Sweet and Sour Greens

New York City cooks, and increasingly cooks across the country, are falling back in love with green markets after a long snowy winter.  Locovorism, to varying degrees, has increasingly shifted from a trend to an established philosophy among chefs and foodies.  Red Hook Community Farm, for me, presents an interesting new challenge.  As the CSA begins distributing weekly shares, the question becomes not “will I eat local and seasonal food this summer and fall” but “how will I use the variety of fresh seasonal produce that I pick up every week.”

For some people, shopping at a farmer’s market is an option.  For those of us who are committed to a local farm through a CSA, eating what’s fresh and what’s in season suddenly becomes the standard way of eating. It is a very new experience for me.  And I know that it might be a very new and challenging experience for some of you as well.  That’s why, every week, I’d like to share with you some of the ideas and recipes that I’ve put together for my CSA share every week. This week I’m making Sweet and Sour Greens. — Adam Gregory

Recipe after the jump.

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CSA Share: June 18

Never seen a garlic scape before? Here's what they look like.

This Saturday is the first pick up of the Red Hook CSA season. We’ll see you on the Farm between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.

If you want to start dreaming of what you’ll make, here’s the list of what to expect in your share.

o   Peas (here’s Jason Adam’s Pea Carbonara recipe from last season)

o   Herbs e.g. scallions, thyme, oregano, mint, sage

o   Lettuce

o   Asian greens e.g. pak choi, tatsoi (Epicurious has a ton of ideas for tatsoi)

o   Chard (here’s what Stacy Cowley did with her chard after last season’s hail storm)

o   Radishes

o   Beets

o   Sorrel

o   Cress

o   Garlic scapes (check out this blog from the Phoenix Farms CSA that features recipes)

Hailstorm Collard Gratin

Most of us have probably already heard about the devastation the hail storm unleashed on the farm; NY1 has a report from the scene.

When I went Saturday to pick up my share at the Harvest Fest (LIVE CHICKENS! I was like a little kid when I spotted them; I’ve probably never been that close to a live chicken before. They are way cuter than pigeons.), I saw the giant bins of shredded “take me I’m free” collards and chard. It’s heartbreaking to see so much of the crop torn down — but I wanted to take a stab at putting at least a bit of it to use. So I loaded up a bag with mangled chard, and set out to find a recipe that would make use of odds-and-ends bits.

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