Mid-Season Update From Ian Marvy

Hi Friends and Neighbors,

We have really begun to feel global climate change in a drastic way this year. Before spring even hit, the apple crop had blossomed. Apples, normally the mainstay of the autumnal fruit CSA, are in for a difficult season; the early warmth in the winter, followed by regular frosts, killed many apple blossoms in early spring. Then heavy wind and rain blew away the second succession of flowers.

Many orchards in the region are expecting smaller yields this year and it’s not just here in our state or our region; the whole Midwest and parts of the Northwest are suffering from 80% crop loss in the apple industry.

Spring as a whole was great for us greens-growing farms. But the heat hit early, as you know, killing off the harvest before we could bring you tomatoes, eggplant and peppers. But the heat is not just the issue. Despite dramatic rain falls that keeps us above the board, the rest of the nation and really the majority of the planet is now in drought.

Wheat, corn and soy are already more expensive on the open commodity market, meaning milk, cheese, meat, and your regular slice will all soon be more expensive.

Here at Added Value have been mindful of the weather and conscious of your timely investment. We plan to continue to deliver high-quality, flavorful, nutritious foods grown in a way that respects the planet, you, your family and our neighbors. As weather changes we are making adjustments and look forward to sharing the bounties to come.

We are motivated by our partnership, thankful for the investment, and excited to share with you the fruits of our collective labor.

Ian

Now some notes from the farm crew.

You’ve probably all seen the garlic curing in the harvest station this past month; it is now ready and you’ll be getting some this week. It was a lot to process and sort out (the biggest, prettiest ones get saved to be seed for next year’s crop); thankfully we had a big crew of young people around today to help us out! Many hands do indeed lighten up the work load.

As for the rest of the share, all across the region and here in Red Hook the summer crops are starting to kick in one by one! We started harvesting tomatoes this week (though there are only enough for market so far. You guys will be getting them in the next couple of weeks) and the eggplants, peppers and cucumbers are starting to look pretty big. Some other things that might be in your share this week: dandelion greens, sorrel, onions, beets, kohlrabi, cooking greens (chard, collards, broccoli greens, amaranth), scallions, squash, arugula…

We’re thrilled to have peaches at a better price than ever before this week. This year’s peaches from Phillips’ Farm have been outstanding, and this week he has offered them to us for a special price. Given the anticipation of high prices in the fall for local fruit, we want to take advantage of every opportunity to provide our CSA with abundant fruit while we can.

Small fruit shares will be receiving 3 lbs of peaches; large shares will be receiving 5 lbs.

For now, enjoy the Red Hook red garlic and the beautiful peaches!

The Added Value Team 

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How A Busy Mom Uses All Those CSA Veggies

Sunday night dinner in the Foley-Murphy household.

Among other things, I’m a mom to an almost five year old and a two month old. Before I was a mom I had hobbies and crafty creative projects going on in my life; now my main hobby is making good food. It works out nicely because my family likes to eat. And for this hobby I love the CSA season. There is nothing better than taking something that we’ve never heard of and turning it into something delicious, especially if my daughter agrees that it is delicious.

I get really excited about it. When I talk about it at social functions and family reunions, I’m met most often with people looking at me like I have three heads (oh, really you made kohlrabi “french fries”… ) but sometimes my excitement finds a kindred spirit.  I’m guessing that in the CSA community there will be more in the later camp and thought I’d share my strategy and a couple of recipes that we have liked in the past few weeks.

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What I Made: Peaches, Beans, Broccoli, Kohlrabi and More

Peaches and grilled pork chops, from Epicurious.com

In order to keep life fresh and exciting, I’m forming my weekly menu around my share of veggies and fruit each week.  And I thought I would share in case you’re short on ideas. — Tracy Shar

This week I didn’t get broccoli, but I saw that the large shares did, so here’s my broccoli recipe which I made last week.  This can easily be made without meat for the veggies among us.

Broccoli Salad

Shred broccoli into a bowl. Add: Handful of raisins, 1/2 cup of red onion, 4 strips of crumbled bacon.

In a separate bowl, mix: 1/2 cup mayo (I used veganaisse since that’s what I had in the house…again to be made vegan!), 1 tablespoon of sugar or alternate sweetener, 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar.

Fold mixture into broccoli mix and eat.  The longer it sits in the fridge the better it is.  It is seriously delicious.

Kohlrabi Trout Salad 
Mix shredded kohlrabi with 1/2 cup mayo and 1 tbsp of fresh lemon juice.  Shred 8 oz. of smoked trout into a bowl. Add two chopped sweet apples. I also used my chives that I took as my herb option this week.  Fold kohlrabi mixture into trout and add salt, pepper, fresh tarragon and parsley to taste.

The remainder of my kohlrabi I chopped and used as crudites for some cashew cheese I had made.  It would also be great for dipping hummus or any other dip.

I tend to use all my greens in salads or veggie shakes (I like to eat them in the morning).

Grilled Pork Chops with Peaches and Beans
Last week I used my beans and peaches in Epicurious’s recipe for grilled pork chops with peaches and pole beans. This week I went more simple with a string bean and arugula salad (which would have been even more perfect last week with both the beans and the arugula).

I’ve just been throwing the squash directly onto the grill, but I think it would also be good in the above salad raw and shredded.

Hope this is helpful!  Tune in next week featuring all next week’s veggies and/or fruits.

Saxelby Cheese Share: June 23

Laini Fondilier of Lazy Lady Farm. Photo by David La Spina for NYT. (Click photo for full story.)

 

Cheese: Tomme de Lay (raw goats’ milk)

Farm: Lazy Lady Farm; Westfield, VT

What Saxelby has to say: Tomme de Lay is a magnificent cheese that pokes fun at one of our country’s most infamous politicians. This cheese was first called Dandy’s Lyin’, due to the fact that the rind is lightly speckled with dandelion greens and summer savory. During a fit of creativity during one evening’s milking (most probably spurred by listening to NPR), Laini Fondilier decided to change the name, and Tomme de Lay was born. An elegant washed rind cheese with a dense chalky center surrounded by a creamy outer layer. Tomme de Lay has hints of grass, spongy mushrooms, and fresh cream with deep gamey and musky notes to round it out.