Week 10 Share

Okay, now it is summer, because we really have tomatoes this time.

And the tomatoes make an amazing salad with the purslane (tomatoes, purslane, garlic, lemon, olive oil = yum!)

-Cukes

-Tomatoes

-Basil

-Hot peppers

-Kale

-Collards

-Purslane

-Herbs

 

Fruit: Peaches, white and yellow

 

Cheese share:

Elsa Mae

Calkins Creamery – Honesdale, Pennsylvania

A creamy, buttery, and yeasty washed rind cheese pioneered by cheesemaker James Regelsky at Calkins Creamery in Pennsylvania. When young, the wheels smell of fruit and yeast and have a pale tawny color. They are washed every 3 days with a b-linens based salt brine to develop the rind. Over the course of their aging, the rinds turn deep orange in color, and the paste undergoes a metamorphosis from being pudgy and custardy to silky, satiny and gooey. The flavor is light, briny and buttery, like a Cerignola olive in cheese form! The cheese is named after the top milk producing cow at Calkins Creamery. Aged 4-8 weeks.

 

Cheese Stats

Milk Type: cow

Milk Treatment: pasteurized

Rennet: vegetarian

Style: washed rind

Texture: soft

Age: 4-8 weeks

 

And for the large share, we also have:

 

Bon Pere

Boston Post Dairy – Enosburg Falls, Vermont

Made from a mixture of 80% cows’ milk and 20% goats’ milk, Bon Pere is a fruity, nutty, and complex mixed milk cheese. Boston Post Dairy is run by the Gervais family, and got its name from the fact that the old Boston Post stagecoach road runs right through the center of their farm. The name Bon Pere translates to ‘good father’, a nod to the four Gervais sisters’ father Robert. (The Gervais sisters now run the Boston Post Dairy – they also have 11 brothers, so perhaps ‘good father’ is a bit of an understatement!) The flavor imparted by the goats’ milk is sweet, malty, and caramelized, while the cows’ milk gives the firm paste a more grassy and buttery tone. Its bright red rind makes for a beautiful presentation, a natural addition to any cheese board.

 

Cheese Stats

Milk Type: goat and cow

Milk Treatment: pasteurized

Rennet: vegetarian

Style: gouda, wax rind

Texture: semi-firm to firm

Age: 3-8 months

2017 Week 9 Share

For veggies this lovely week in August we have:

Cukes

Green beans

Basil

Radishes

Hot peppers

Collards

Chard

Purslane

Corn

 

Fruit: nectarines, white and yellow

 

This week’s cheeses are:

Calderwood

Jasper Hill Farm – Greensboro, Vermont

Calderwood is a rich and robust wheel of raw cows’ milk cheese coated in finely chopped fibers of hay. The wheels are washed with brine for six months in the Cellars at Jasper Hill before being coated in hay and sealed in Cryovac. After an additional four months of aging, the cryovac is removed and the cheeses are left to dry and form a natural rind in the cellars. The finished wheels of cheese are firm nutty and complex, with hints of earth, caramel, chestnut honey, and tropical fruit.

 

The hay used to make Calderwood is harvested from pastures surrounding Jasper Hill Farm and dried in a special hay drying machine. The Calderwood Cropping Center, the first machine of its kind in the United States, can dry hay in a matter of a few hours, where it would take 3-4 days to dry in a sunny field. Jasper Hill Farm’s founders, Andy and Mateo Kehler, observed a hay dryer in action in Parma Italy, a region whose cheese calls for grass-fed milk, but whose climate is a bit too rainy for making consistent dry hay, and were inspired to bring the Italian technology stateside. The Cropping Center allows them to make high quality dry hay for feed that lasts the whole year, which is paramount to their quality standards as cheesemakers. Many of Jasper Hill’s award-winning cheeses are crafted from raw milk. Good quality hay is a key ingredient in the cheesemaking process, ensuring the microbiology of the cows’ digestive systems and the milk itself is at an optimal place for cheesemaking.

 

Cheese Stats

Milk Type: cow

Milk Treatment: raw

Rennet: animal

Style: alpine

Texture: firm

Age: 9-10 months

Size: 20lb wheel

 

And for the second piece of the large share:

 

Braeburn

Bonnieview Farm – Craftsbury, Vermont

A big bold wheel of Alpine-style cow’s milk cheese from Bonnieview Farm that is the definition of seasonal cheese. Braeburn is made in the winter months when Bonnieview Farm’s sheep are off duty. Come summertime the wheels are fully matured and ready to enjoy! This season’s wheels are sweet and milky with some notes of fermented fruit and savory spring onion. Bonnieview Farm has a unique seasonal cheesemaking cycle because they milk both sheep and cows – their sheep produce milk from May through October each year, and the cows come online in the late summer when the sheep milk supply is beginning to dwindle. They make mixed milk cheeses until the sheep are dried off for the fall and winter and then transition to 100% cows’ milk cheese. Aged 6 months or more.

 

Cheese Stats

Milk Type: cow

Milk Treatment: raw

Rennet: animal

Style: blue

Texture: semi-firm

Age: 3-4 months

2017 Week 8 Share

This beginning of August week we have

-Swiss chard

-Curly and/or white russian kale,

-Nappa cabbage and/or Tiara cabbage

-Purslane

-Collard greens

-Cherry tomatoes

-Cucumbers

-And some type of herb!

 

Dorset

Consider Bardwell Farm – West Pawlet, Vermont

Can you say asparagus? Dorset is an incredibly talented shape-shifter of a cheese, melding a myriad of different sensory experiences into each tiny morsel you chew.  Cultured butter, earth, blanched asparagus and root vegetables are all things that come to mind as the smooth and slightly pungent paste melts in your mouth.  Dorset is fashioned in the style of a simple Alpine tomme, and has a pliant, creamy texture and a golden ochre paste. The wheels are washed with brine as they age, giving the cheese a tawny orange rind that can contribute a slightly sandy, gritty texture as the cheese ages. Aged 2-3 months in the caves at Consider Bardwell Farm.

 

Cheese Stats

Milk Type: cow

Milk Treatment: raw

Rennet: vegetarian

Style: washed rind

Texture: soft

Age: 2-3 months

Our cheese is:

 

And for the large cheese share, there’s something extra (Going forward, we’ll be selecting two different cheeses for the large share so you will receive two descriptions.)

Lake’s Edge

Blue Ledge Farm – Salisbury, Vermont

Named for the shore of the great lake Champlain, which straddles the border between Vermont and New York. Lake’s Edge is a musky and zippy little number with a pencil-thin wisp of vegetable ash running through the center. The paste is chalky and concentrated, but has a magnificent melt in your mouth quality that brings just the right amount of tang. Made from the milk of Blue Ledge Farm’s herd of Alpine and La Mancha goats. The delicate bloomy rind envelops the cheese over its 6 week ripening period.

 

Cheese Stats

Milk Type: goat

Milk Treatment: pasteurized

Rennet: animal

Style: bloomy rind

Texture: soft

Age: 4-6 weeks

 

 

2017 Week 7 Share

Finally the heat broke and we got some much-needed rain!

Here’s what you can look forward to for this glorious July weather:

-cucumbers

-kale

-chard

-callaloo

-carrots

-cabbage

-tatsoi

-green beans

-garlic scapes

 

And for fruit there will be

-apricots

-peaches

Enjoy!

 

And the cheese this week:

Red Rock

Roelli Cheese Haus (thermalized cows’ milk/animal rennet, Shullsburg, WI)

A new take on two classic cheeses! Orange cheddar meets blue, in an epiphany of complementary colors! (and awesome flavor too!) It is rumored that the first cheeses to be dyed with annatto seed came from Northern France in an effort to appease Napoleon when the French were fighting with the Dutch way back when… (He couldn’t get his Edam on the regular. Can you imagine?! France importing cheese from Holland?!) And it is also rumored that American GI’s brought that love of orange cheese back with them from France back in WWII. However our cheddars turned orange, it is a cheesy tradition worth celebrating. Red Rock is a brick of orange cheddar from Wisconsin with blue culture and blue veins running through it. The rind is rustic and natural, and allowed to form naturally after the bricks are made. It’s a true American original! The flavor of Red Rock is a winning combination of roasted peanuts, toasty caramel, mushrooms, and onions. Aged for 2-3 months.

 

Milk Type: cow

Milk Treatment: pasteurized

Rennet: animal

Style: natural rind

Texture: semi-firm

Age: 2-3 months

 

2017 Week 6 Share

Here’s your share for this steamy week of Mid July:

-Napa cabbage

-Kale

-Chard

-Callaloo

-Carrots

-Cucumbers

-Daikon radish

-Garlic scapes

-Thyme

 

(Callaloo? What’s that? A leafy green vegetable, also known as amaranth. Very popular in Jamaica. Highly nutritious!)

 

Fruit share will be cherries.

 

The cheese this week:

Tres Bonne

Boston Post Dairy – Enosburg Falls, Vermont

Boston Post Dairy is named after the Old Post Stagecoach road which runs straight through the farm property. The farm boasts a whopping 200 goats producing milk for the farm’s cheese, soaps, and baked goods. If anything, Tres Bonne is modestly named.  It is truly more than a “very good” aged goat’s milk cheese.  With a golden wax rind, and a fresh, minerally, and slightly sweet flavor, Tres Bonne is reminiscent of a fine goat gouda. Aged 2-5 months.

 

Cheese Stats

Milk Type: goat

Milk Treatment: pasteurized

Rennet: vegetarian

Style: waxed rind

Texture: firm

Age: 2-5  months

2017 Week 5 Share

Here’s what you can expect for your share this July 12 and July 15 pickup:

-napa cabbage

-some variety of kale

-daikon radishes

-Swiss chard (for at least one day, maybe both)

-kohlrabi (maybe for one day)

-zucchini (maybe for one day)

 

Fruit will be maybe cherries and or maybe peaches

Cheese share:

Bonnie Blue

Bonnieview Farm – Craftsbury, Vermont

A seasonal cow’s milk blue from Bonnieview Farm. Though Bonnieview first earned acclaim for their line of succulent sheep’s milk cheeses, their cow’s milk cheeses are stars in their own right. Bonnieview Farm produces cow’s milk cheese from the milk of their small herd when their sheep are off duty – from about October until May of each year. Bonnie Blue generally makes its debut in early spring each year, giving us something to celebrate before the sheep’s milk cheeses become available. Bonnie Blue is a moist, fudgy blue cheese that is sweet, fruity, and salty all at once. Think Stilton with a slightly Gorgonzola-esque black pepper kick. A perfect blue for any cheese board… Rich and flavorful yet not overpowering.

 

Cheese Stats

Milk Type: cow

Milk Treatment: raw

Rennet: animal

Style: blue

Texture: semi-firm

Age: 2-4 months

 

Enjoy!

2017 Week 4 Share

Hi All,

Here’s your post-Independence Day share:

For this week Saturday there will be:

-carrots

-asian greens

-callaloo

-sage

-daikon radishes

-turnips

-garlic scapes

 

For the fruit share we believe there will be cherries.

 

Cheese this week:

Manchester

Consider Bardwell Farm – West Pawlet, Vermont

Consider Bardwell Farm is the site of the first cheesemaking coop in Vermont, dating back to 1864.  The stream next to the farm used to provide power for the cheese house and also water for the making of the cheese. Manchester is a firm, aged goats’ milk cheese, crafted from the milk of Angela Miller’s herd of Alpine and Oberhaasli goats. The aroma is that of fresh cut grass and asparagus stalks, and the flavor is deeply mineral and sweet. The tawny orange rinds are washed as the cheeses age, heightening nutty flavor notes present in the milk. Aged 3-4 months.

Cheese Stats

Milk Type: goat

Milk Treatment: raw

Rennet: vegetarian

Style: washed rind

Texture: semi-firm

Age: 3-4 months