What I Made: Peaches and Cream Crepes

Ingredients:
1 cup whole milk
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup yellow cornmeal, preferably stone-ground
2 large eggs
5 Tbs. unsalted butter, melted
1 tsp. granulated sugar, plus more to taste
1/4 tsp. fine sea salt
4 peaches, halved, pitted and thinly sliced
1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice
Canola oil for cooking
1/2 cup mascarpone cheese, at room temperature
About 2 Tbs. heavy cream
Confectioners’ sugar for dusting

Directions:
To make the crepe batter, in a blender, combine the milk, flour, cornmeal, eggs, 2 Tbs. of the butter, the 1 tsp. granulated sugar and the salt. Process until smooth. Let stand at room temperature for about 30 minutes. Meanwhile, in a bowl, combine the peaches, lemon juice and sugar to taste, and toss to coat evenly. Let stand at room temperature for about 30 minutes to allow the peaches to release some of their juice.

Lightly oil a 7-inch nonstick frying pan and place over medium-high heat until hot. Pour 1/4 cup of the batter into the pan and tilt the pan to cover the bottom evenly. Drizzle a little batter into any holes. Cook until the bottom is golden brown, about 1 minute. Flip and cook the other side until golden. Transfer to a plate. Repeat with the remaining batter, adding more oil to the pan as needed and stacking the crepes, separated by parchment or waxed paper, as they are ready. You should have 10 crepes, or 2 more than you need (the extra crepes are the cook’s treat!).

Preheat an oven to 400°F. Lightly brush a rimmed baking sheet with some of the remaining 3 Tbs. butter. In a small bowl, using a fork, stir together the mascarpone and enough cream to create a creamy mixture, then stir in granulated sugar to taste. Set aside for serving.

Place 1 crepe on a work surface. Spoon one-eighth of the peaches in an even layer on half of the crepe, then fold over the other half to cover. Fold the crepe in half again, to form a triangle. Place on the prepared baking sheet. Repeat with 7 more crepes and all of the peaches. Brush the tops of the filled crepes with the remaining butter. Bake just until hot throughout, about 5 minutes. To serve, place 2 crepes on each plate. Crown the crepes with a dollop of the mascarpone cream, and then sift confectioners’ sugar over the top. Serve at once. Serves 4.

peachesandcreamcrepes

What I Made: Eggplant Rollatini

1 large eggplant (about 1 3/4 pounds), cut lengthwise into 8 slices
Salt and pepper
4 large eggs
3/4 cup pesto (I made mine with basil, parsley and garlic from our shares, and used pine nuts)
2 1/2 cups bread crumbs
Olive Oil or Cooking Spray
3/4 cup ricotta cheese
1/3 cup grated pecorino-romano cheese
1 cup store-bought marinara sauce

Season the eggplant with salt and pepper. In a wide, shallow bowl, whisk together the eggs and 4 tablespoons pesto. Pour the bread crumbs onto a large plate. Dip each eggplant slice into the egg mixture, then coat with the bread crumbs.
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees ;. In a large nonstick skillet, heat olive oil or cooking spray over medium-high heat. Working in batches, cook the eggplant until golden, 2 minutes on each side. Transfer the eggplant to a paper-towel-lined baking sheet.

In a small bowl, combine the ricotta and 3 tablespoons pecorino-romano; season with salt and pepper. Spread 1 tablespoon of the remaining pesto on each eggplant slice and top with about 2 tablespoons of the cheese mixture. Roll up each slice. Bake until the eggplant is tender when pierced with a toothpick, about 10 minutes.
Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, bring the marinara sauce to a simmer. Serve the roll-ups with the sauce and remaining pecorino.

Yum.
eggplantrollatini

What I Made: Chilled Tomato Soup

For this I just threw together a bunch of stuff we got in our shares.

4 large tomatoes
2 peppers (I used the white ones, mmm)
2 shallots
1 clove garlic
a few stalks of celery
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
a splash of agave
salt and pepper to taste

throw everything in a vitamix or high speed blender and eat with a chunk of bread. This uses a ton of stuff from our share and is super yummy.

What I Made: Thai Basil Chicken

Thai Basil Chicken

I altered this recipe to use what I had on hand from the CSA. I had a couple of bundles of basil from the last couple of weeks that I kept alive in water, so there was plenty…although technically this recipe calls for holy basil the basil we have from the farm works wonderfully!!

1lb ground chicken
2 bunches of basil, stems removed
3 tblsp fish sauce
6 hot peppers from last weeks share — less if you don’t like spicy, minced
2 shallots, minced
1 large clove minced garlic
cooking oil (I used hot sesame oil)

Heat oil in wok
add garlic, shallots and peppers and cook until garlic and shallots start to brown
add ground chicken, and cook, stirring, till browned and juice from meat is almost gone.

Add fish sauce and stir. Add basil and mix in a few times. Remove from heat and eat! This is wildly delicious and goes well with rice or a leafy salad.

thaibasil

Kohlrabi-Apple Remoulade

kohlrabi

Remoulade sounds fancy, right? Just imagine, you can set this on your Thanksgiving table and announce its name, and your guests will swoon. It’s basically the French version of cole slaw, but we’ll keep that between us.

Remoulade is traditionally made with celery root, but it adapts well to other vegetables. To keep your remoulade crunchy, make the dressing tonight, then grate the kohlrabi and apple tomorrow and stir everything together. Easy, fancy-sounding, and a much-needed raw counterpart to all that starch? Yes, please.

- Moriah Simmons

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Pumpkin Pie from Actual Pumpkin

Photo from Pumpkinrecipes.org

You know that charming little pumpkin from a share two weeks ago? (You may have magicked part of it into juice.) It really wants to be a pie. The thing is, the round orange vegetables we know as pumpkins are generally lighter in color and milder in flavor than a lot of their squash cousins, who make up most of the burnt-orange canned “pumpkin” pie filling we all know. But that’s ok because we are going to work with what we have, darn it!

The spices in this pie filling are adapted ever-so-slightly to work with the squash at hand, so it’s not the cinnamon-bomb you might have grown up with. Rather, it’s a classy citrus and nutmeg custard pie, which will fit right in at your classy Thanksgiving feast.

- Moriah Simmons

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Wizard Juice

pumpkin juice

You’ve read at least one Harry Potter book, I’ll wager. So you know that the most compelling beverage in the whole series is the pumpkin juice served in the Hogwarts dining hall. I’m pretty sure this is made-up and not based on any traditional British recipe (unlike butterbeer), so I have invented a recipe for it, to make a tasty, booze-free Thanksgiving drink that conveniently uses the small pumpkin from the CSA share a few weeks ago. You’ll just need some pumpkin, sugar, spices, and water. Magic optional.

-Moriah Simmons

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A Bad Case of the Apples

Thanks to the bounty of the fruit share, I (like the rest of you) have more apples than I can in a month. This is a great opportunity to preserve them via freezing and canning, so I don’t have to waste anything. I like to make a big batch of applesauce, save some, and turn the rest into apple butter. First up, an easy recipe for bright pink applesauce.  – Moriah Simmons Continue reading

Apple Butter

apple butterNow that we’ve got a batch of applesauce, let’s go a little further and turn it into apple butter. Have you had apple butter? It contains no actual butter (vegans rejoice!), just apples, spices, and sugar. This is a silky, spicy spread that can be slathered on toast for a quick breakfast or spooned into prebaked tart shells for an elegant dessert. -Moriah Simmons Continue reading

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